Success Will Write Apocalypse Across the Sky - _The Grand Partition and the Abrogation of Idolatry_
(Nuclear Blast, 2009)
by: Jackie Smit (8 out of 10)
You need to have been blessed with a generous supply of confidence to name your band after the mouthful that this Florida-based lot have opted for, because let's face it: yelling "Good evening, we are Success Will Write Apocalypse Across the Sky" is going to ellicit a snigger or two in most towns. Luckily for them, SWAAtS have plenty to puff their chests over and whatever grins their moniker may draw from the sceptics would likely be slapped clean off by the time the group have eclipsed the two-minute mark of their set.

Seeped in vintage death metal tradition, SWAAtS only occasionally turn to modern twists to help hammer their point across, unlike the pinch and beatdown obsessing of their regular touring mates in Bleeding Through. They're better off for it too, as "10,000 Sermons - 1 Solution" charges off the blocks at breakneck pace and leaves a clear trail of buzzsaw riff-led destruction in its wake. Quick to show that this isn't an album of constant chaos, both "Cattle" and "Agenda" show off an equally uncanny knack for ultra-catchy breaks that would not only give the best in the business a serious run for their money, but also underlines why the band's live shows have developed a reputation for crowd carnage. The zeitgeisty lyrical approach may sometimes think itself more insightful than it actually is, but when a band manage to craft a debut of this quality, they could be singing about Sunday School Picnics for all I care. Impressive stuff indeed.

Contact: http://www.myspace.com/swwaats

(article published 21/5/2009)


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