Longing for Dawn - _A Treacherous Ascension_
(Grau / Prophecy, 2007)
by: Pedro Azevedo (8 out of 10)
The fact that this Canadian band is probably influenced by the likes of Thergothon and Skepticism should provide plenty of motivation for some readers to keep going and others to skip to the next review immediately. For those interested enough in funeral doom to still be reading, I should add that Longing for Dawn have put together a rather strong release.

Near 50 minutes in length but divided into just four tracks, you get the expected song duration for the genre. The pace is very slow throughout, with no sudden increases. On the contrary, sometimes the music descends into an even deeper state of introspection and abstraction than that already provided by the plodding drums and chords, the sparingly used and effective keyboard, and the guttural vocals. This is one of those doom metal albums that does not make any concessions in its creation of an impenetrably thick atmosphere; as if it covers and smothers your head in layer after layer of thick gauze.

_A Treacherous Ascension_ also benefits a well balanced production job, providing the music with enough low-end without sacrificing clarity, so there really isn't much to be faulted. The album suffers a little from the lack of any real climaxes, and they may not quite reach the inspiration of classics like Evoken's _Embrace the Emptiness_ or _Quietus_, but they may well be on their way there. In any case, _A Treacherous Ascension_ will remain as one of the funeral doom highlights of the year.

Contact: http://www.longingfordawn.ca

(article published 5/4/2007)


ALBUMS
4/15/2009 P Azevedo 8 Longing for Dawn - Between Elation and Despair
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