Antaeus - _Cut Your Flesh and Worship Satan_
(Baphomet, 2000)
by: Aaron McKay (8 out of 10)
Nothing quite like the direct approach, huh? No real gray area there, right? Any questions about where this French band stands? Didn't think so... These guys are quite new to me. One thing I -do- know is that this band used to employ the talents of a guitarist named Antaeus, but not now. Currently the group is comprised of Storm (drums), Set and Thorgon (guitars), Sagoth (bass) and MkM (vocals) and these guys make a point rather quickly, even without the benefit of seeing the album title. Massive catastrophic conflagration to make Hades look like a ski resort. There are no lyrics printed in the inlay book, but I think I could wager on the story they'd tell if there were. Eight tracks comprise _Cut Your Flesh and Worship Satan_ and each song is not without depth. Sometimes I have found that bands of this breed devote all to blast, speed and fury. While there is -plenty- of that on _CYFaWS_, Antaeus uses a dimensional music and vocal approach together that is more interesting than even some early Mayhem and Ancient material; kind of like a cross between these two bands I just mentioned and Crimson Moon. One thing that I picked up from the CD inlay book is a Napalm Death sticker on one of guitarist's instruments. It isn't all that hard to hear an influence from Barney, Shane and the boys on Anteus's style either. Obscure and wildly blunt, Antaeus is probably a band that you will need to discover for yourself. Words almost fail their function.

Contact: antaeus@multimania.com

(article published 20/11/2000)


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11/10/2006 A Marouchos Antaeus: Straight From the Woundz
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