Altar - _In the Name of the Father_
(Pavement Music, 2000)
by: Aaron McKay (6.5 out of 10)
Don't be thrown by what could be construed as a lower marking on this release. Launching their savagery from Holland, Altar pours forth some truly malevolent and spiteful offerings on this, the band's fourth release. For the most part, I very much agree with the comments expressed by my colleague Adrian Bromley in CoC #33, when he reviewed _Provoke_. Altar's sound is as metal as you'd want it to be, sounding somewhat like subdued or suppressed _Harmony Corruption_-era Napalm Death. The band has a truly well put together sound showcased no better place on the record than on a couple of back-to-back tracks, namely "I Spit Black Bile on You" and "Hate Scenario". As I understand things, after parting company with Displeased Records, Altar took matters into their own hands when making _ItNotF_ before ever firming up a deal with Pavement. Pavement added two extra cuts to this release, "I Am Your New Provider" and a cover of the classic "The Trooper", by Iron Maiden. Looking directly at this effort, Altar clearly has nothing to be ashamed of; the album is powerful. At the same time, I can honestly say the material included on _ItNotF_ is mostly forgettable, with the aforementioned couple of songs being the exceptions. Were this a spectacular release, I would say subjugate yourself to the will of Altar, but as things are, I might only advise visiting their sanctuary for a brief sermon before joining the congregation.

(article published 12/8/2000)


CHATS
8/12/2000 A McKay Altar: The Shrine Unshrouded
ALBUMS
9/1/1998 A Bromley 6 Altar - Provoke
7/17/1996 A Bromley 7 Altar - Altar
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